In God We Trust Learn to prevent breast cancer at home today
 

CidpUSA.org

 
Home
Bras &  Cancer
Breast Chemicals
Mammogram cancer
Breast Massage
Breast Implants
Breast Exam
Breast Lymph
Breast Feeding
Bra Chemicals
Breast Cancer Herbs
Bible Diet
Breast nutrients
Diet Page
Autoimmune diseases
Cancer Book

Colostrum

Foods for health

Caveman Diet

Anticancer Diet

Ketogenic Diet

Myasthenia Diet

Natural Diet for diseases

Fat lowering Diet

Lower Cholesterol

Libido Diet

Homocysteine Lowering diet

Bible Diet

Hemodialysis Diet

Iodine deficient diet

Epilepsy diet

Food additives

No artificial sweetener in diet

Vinegar Benefits

Loss of appetitive

Breast cancer herbs

The best lifestyle

Detoxify diet

Avoid Gum

Right Fat Diet

chemicals in French fries

 

Myofacial pain

Lower back pain

Disc herniation

Back pain

Neck pain tips

Breast cancer Bra

 Natural makeup

Are You Hypothyroid

Vitamin-D Deficiency

Dubai Trip

   Dont run after diamonds and Gold turn yourself into a Diamond or Gold read our e-book 
     Welcome to the CIDP  International organization   
 
        
Health effects of Genes on autoimmune diseases

Researchers have identified a key gene that plays a role in the autoimmune disease Lupus.

The culprit is a defective version of a gene called OX40L that is important to several different types of immune system cell.

It affects lymphocytes, white blood cells which are one of the body's main defenders against infection.

Lupus, or Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), afflicts around 50,000 people in the UK, mostly women.

It causes a skin rash, joint pains and fatigue, and can lead to serious inflammation of the kidneys and other internal organs. People with Lupus are five times more likely to die early than members of the general population.

The gene variant is carried by one in six people in the UK. Having one copy of the Lupus gene raises the risk of developing the disease by 50%.

Professor Tim Vyse, from Imperial College London, who led the research funded by the Wellcome Trust, said: "Although it appears to have a number of environmental triggers, we are now beginning to get a clearer picture of the role that genetics also plays in the disease.

 

"Identifying a specific gene will enable us to see at a molecular level what is behind Lupus and develop treatments targeted at inhibiting or blocking the action of those genes."

The findings are published in the journal Nature Genetics.

Prof Vyse's group and other scientists have previously identified two other genes implicated in Lupus, IRFS and FCGR3B.

 

Step by step guidelines to Help.
 

 



 

    Health effects of Genes on autoimmune diseases  
    Health effects of Genes on autoimmune diseases