God is our Guide  Number 1 site for helping
 

CIDPUSA.ORG

 
Home
Diagnosis
Treatment
Pathology
Variants
CIDP info
Fibromyalgia
IVIG
Anti-inflammatory Diet
Burning  Feet Home
Services Page
Chronic Fatigue
Autoimmune diseases
Prognosis
Bible healing
Celiac disease

Statin Neuropathy

Statin kidney failure

Statin neuropathy

Statin

Gluthione

Ivanka Trump

Beauty Tips for Women

Alzheimers autoimmune research studies

Vitamin-D Deficiency

Antidepressants

CoEnzymeQ10

Graves disease

Morgellons Syndrome

Cardiolipin

Saffron the top spice
Natural Makeup
Cancer & Lipstick
Magic cleaner
Mercury in makeup
Toxic Lipstick
Hair chemicals
Toxic Baby products
Toxic calcium
Chemicals in soap
Kitchen toxins
Sesame Seed Oil
Oil pulling
Bras cause breast cancer
Skin repair Clinic
Nail Fungus
Toxic Lipstick

 Homeopathy intro

Homeopathic Hepatitis

Circadian rhythm

 

 

  Infections & Autoimmune diseases  

  alternatives treatment of autoimmune  e-book 

Special GoogleHealth Search

The Cholesterol Myth

 

Cholesterol is made in the liver and return there after it has been released in bile and the digestive tract, where it helps digest fats before being reabsorbed into the bloodstream. Certain protein known as low density lipoproteins (LDLs) have been found to be responsible for carrying cholesterol to the artery wall. While others, high density lipoproteins (HDLs), help to return cholesterol to the liver

We have learnt that cholesterol isn’t the bad guy. After all, the body actually makes cholesterol and we all carry about 150 grams (one-third of a pound) of it in our bodies. Of this, 7 grams is carried in our blood. The body needs cholesterol to make sex hormones, vitamin D and to digest and transport fats (lipids). Having said that, having a high blood cholesterol level is associated with doubling of the risk of cardiovascular disease.

HDL cholesterol is sometimes thought of as ‘good cholesterol’ and LDL cholesterol as ‘bad cholesterol’. Because of this, cholesterol tests now report not only your overall cholesterol level, but also how much of that cholesterol is on the good HDL , and how much on the bad LDL. If, for example, you have a high total cholesterol and much of it is in the form of LDL, your risk is high. While, if you have a low total cholesterol and much of it is on the HDL your risk is low.

There are many ways to lower cholesterol. among them changing to a veggie diet. Taking whole brown rice or Chinese red rice. Other ways to reduce cholesterol are lipid lowering spices, exercise, fasting, water therapy. Which spices to take, ginger, Curcumin, onion, garlic, cinnamon and of course multi grain bread.

I must add that the American Heart association has said that inflammation causes heart diseases and not cholesterol and CDC agrees with this. Rather the statement on inflammation was a joint effort of American heart association & CDC.

---------------------------------------------------------------

One patient was on a ventilator in NYC and dyeing in a ICU, he walked out of the hospital in three days after stopping the statins. A reputed pharma company paid several million dollars for his hospital stay to his insurance carrier.

  • WHAT YOU CAN DO TO HELP YOURSELF

Cholesterol

 Cholesterol is an essential component in the body. It is found in all the cells of the body, particularly in the brain and nerve cells. Body cells are continually dying and new ones being made. Cholesterol is a major building block from which cell walls are made. Cholesterol is also used to make a number of other important substances: hormones (including the sex hormones), bile acids and, in conjunction with sunlight on the skin, vitamin D 3 . The body uses large quantities of cholesterol every day and the substance is so important that, with the exception of brain cells, every body cell has the ability to make it. 

Cholesterol may be ingested in animal products, but less than twenty percent of your body's cholesterol needs will be supplied in this way. Your body then makes up the difference. If you eat less cholesterol, your body merely compensates by making more. Although the media and food companies still warn against cholesterol in diet, it has been repeatedly demonstrated that the level of cholesterol in your blood is affected very little by the amount of cholesterol you eat.

Neither is raised blood cholesterol a predictor of CHD in people over sixty. It has also long been known that simple events, such as putting a cuff around the arm prior to taking a blood sample, or fear of the needle, can result in raised cholesterol values. And, even where these are avoided, large fluctuations are known with peak to nadir variations of as much as twenty-three percent. Lastly, cholesterol is only one of the constituents of an atheroma and, if you think about it, cholesterol is so necessary and so widespread in the body, it would have been surprising if it had not been found. Nevertheless the lowering of blood cholesterol became the sole objective in the fight against CHD; and the two principal methods used to achieve this are with diet and drugs.